Tagging Up In Softball

Table of Contents

A tag-up situation is a play that allows a runner already on a base to advance one or more bases when the batter hits the ball in the air and a defender hits the catch ball before it hits the ground. It is a play that occurs during

Here are the conditions that a runner must meet in order to attempt tagging:

  • The base must already have a runner
  • Out he must be less than 2
  • The runner must touch the base when the ball is caught

 

The first one is obvious, but I want to clarify that the batter cannot call. If a defender catches the ball in the air, the batter is automatically out no matter what happens afterward.

If he already has 2 he should have less than 2 outs because the inning ends when a defender catches the ball. Remember he only gets 3 outs for each offensive half of the inning. Think of tagging as game day. No matter how far you miss, as long as you get back to base or the next target before the ball, you’re safe.

Runners may attempt to advance after catching the ball unless the umpire has signaled the end of the play.

 

What Is The Tag Up Rule?

In softball and baseball, tag-up rules require baserunners to hold the bases until an opposing player catches a hit ball in the air or the ball falls. If an opponent catches the ball, the runner must return to base and has the choice of staying on base or legally attempting to advance. If the ball lands in fair territory, runners are not required to return to base to tag. If fouled in his territory the ball becomes dead and the runner cannot advance. If the defending team notices that the runner has been caught from the bases, the player with the ball attempts to throw the ball to the bases before the runner returns and is out.

When you’re a baserunner and your teammate hits a fly ball, it’s common to take a few steps toward the nearest base. This gives you a head start when the ball lands safely in fair territory. But don’t stray too far from your base, especially if your opponent plans to move forward after catching the ball. Getting back to base takes precious time, and your opponent will notice that you’re tagging along and trying to advance.

 

How Does A Runner Tag Up?

In softball and baseball, the tag-up rule requires the baserunner to hold the base until an opposing player catches a hit ball in the air or the ball falls off. If an opponent catches the ball, the runner must return to base and has the choice of staying on base or legally attempting to advance. If the ball lands in fair territory, runners are not required to return to base to tag. If fouled in his territory the ball becomes dead and the runner cannot advance. If the defending team notices that the runner has been caught from the bases, the player with the ball attempts to throw the ball to the bases before the runner returns and is out.

When you’re a baserunner and your teammate hits a fly ball, it’s common to take a few steps toward the nearest base. This gives you a head start when the ball lands safely in fair territory. But don’t stray too far from your base, especially if your opponent plans to move forward after catching the ball. Getting back to base takes precious time, and your opponent will notice that you’re tagging along and trying to advance.

 

When Should You Tag?  

Tagging up occurs in softball when the runner or runners on a base hit the ball in the air to advance to the next base. Often less than two outs to the outfield. Runners must make contact with the base they started on and wait for the ball to be caught before proceeding to the next base. If a runner gets on base early and the defending team throws the ball back to the base from which the runner started, the decision is up to the umpire.

When tagging from first or second base, hit the ball far enough in the outfield to advance. An outfielder’s pitch to second or third base is much shorter than a pitch to the plate. When the ball is hit in the air into the outfield, run from the base to find the ball instantly. Maintain an athletic posture so you can return to your base to tag a dropped fly ball or move on to the next base. When the ball is flat, stay off the base and be prepared to move forward when the ball drops. If you get hit deep in the outfield and run away, get to base immediately and wait for the ball to be caught.

When an outfielder catches the ball, they should be ready to sprint to the nearest base and slide into safety. If you tag from third base and have less than 2 outs, return to base as soon as the ball hits the outfield. Some coaches teach players to look for catches on their own from third base, while others instruct players to listen to coaches who tell them when to go home. The second scenario is that the player is facing straight at home at his plate and sprinting towards home at his plate on the coach’s orders, so he could be a second faster in a few minutes than in the first scenario.

 

Conclusion

Success in softball takes time and practice. It is important for coaches to practice making substitutions in training, especially from the third game to the home game, until the coach tells the players when to make substitutions. Remember that in softball every run counts and every baserunner plays a role. Be smart with the base. If you hesitate, don’t go. If you decide to go, make a commitment and do everything you can for your safety. Never leave the bag while tagging as the opposing team and the referee may catch you. At the end of the day, be proactive and smart with your base because a smart base run wins the game.

Clark Harris

Clark Harris

"I live and breath Softball"

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